Professional reading from Facebook and Twitter Part 15

Reading number 1

Blog: Education Week

Blog post: Research-Based Tech Implementation: Q&A With Eric Sheninger and Tom Murray

Posted on Twitter by @E_Sheninger

Reading number 2

Blog: Class Tech Tips

Blog post: 7 3D Printing Lessons for Teachers

Posted on Twitter by  @ClassTechTips

Reading number 3

Location: Epilog Laser YouTube Channel

See what a laser cutter can do. A range of videos showing the creative potential of a laser cutter.

Posted on Twitter by 

 

Australian Curriculum Lessons – Website

The Australian Curriculum Lessons website has been around for a few years now and has built up a wide range of free lessons and programs for teachers which are linked to the Australian Curriculum. This is a great resource particularly if you have limited experience in a subject or want to refresh an old program with new ideas.

Teacher resources can range from one off lesson plans to complete 6 week programs with detailed lesson notes. All resources needed for each lesson/program are provided at the bottom of the lesson/program outline.

Check out these examples and explore the website to find lessons and programs from your subject area.

100m Sprint Analysis – A PE Lesson Based on Usain Bolt! (Yr 7-10)

Global Systems Impacting Our Planet – A 15-Page Science Resource For Year 10

Introduction to Programming via Bee Bots (F/ 1/2) Lesson Plan

 

Procedural Writing with Digital Technology Unit: George’s Marvellous Medicine (Year 2 5-6 week program)

 

Changing Nations (The Population Shift) – A Geography Lesson for Year 8/9

 

We’re Going On a Bear Hunt – Music Lesson Plan for F-2

 

Paper Houses – 3D Shapes, Area and Volume Yr 5-7 Maths

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All images from the Australian Curriculum Lessons website.

I say well done and good job too much!

I take a fair bit of video in my R/1 PE class because it helps me identify student achievement. While I was watching a video of my students doing some ball handling skills, which included dribbling, catching and throwing I noticed that my feedback during that section of the lesson was a combination of phrases like well done and good job. While this type of praise can make students smile and feel good it does not necessarily improve learning.

I’m not discounting general praise statements, for some students it is exactly what they need. I could have however been providing my students much more specific feedback/praise to reinforce the cues I had asked students to focus on when they were catching, throwing and dribbling. For example – watch the ball (don’t look away), when you catch the ball have your arms outstretched not by your side, have soft fingers and big hands, use the tips of your fingers to bounce the ball not your palm and so on. By saying well done I am not acknowledging the specific learning the student has applied, for example, that was a great catch because you held your arms out in front of you. The child is much more likely to hold their arms out in front next time because I have positively reinforced that specific behaviour.

It is not new to me that specific/targeted feedback is more effective than general praise but that has not stopped me from defaulting to a natural response when a child does something well. During a fast paced and busy PE lesson it is easier to revert back to a natural response than it is to identify clearly to the student what they are doing well. It took a video of my teaching to remind me of that.

Have you ever seen or heard yourself teach?
What do you think you would discover if you did?

A quick response formative assessment tool – Plickers

Looking for a formative assessment response tool that does not require your students to have an iPad, PC or laptop? Looking for a tool that still allows you to collect and collate students responses quickly?

Plickers does not require students to have their own device only the teacher. Students need a paper response card to hold up for the teacher to scan using their phone. The paper response cards are free and downloadable from the Plicker’s website.

Below is a Plickers student response card. You will notice that when you set up your classes in Plickers that each student is assigned a number. It is important the student has the correctly numbered card. The card below is card number 1. After a question has been asked the student holds the card up with the letter that they think corresponds with the correct answer at the top. On the card below the letter ‘B’ is at the top. The teacher walks around and scans each card collating all student responses quickly and seeing which students answered correctly or incorrectly. Card sets can be used with multiple classes for example card number 1 can be used across four different classes for four different students.

The videos below shows how to set up an account, classes, questions and scan response cards as well as demonstrating the use of Plickers in a classroom.

 

Plickers Tutorial 2016 Formative Assessment Tool

 
See how a teacher uses Plickers to identify students pre knowledge about a topic before beginning a unit of work